No Fast Music Or Fast Running: COVID Rules In Seoul Force Gym-Goers To Slow Down

People work out at a fitness center in Seoul on Tuesday as South Korea exposed execution of level 4 social distancing actions amidst problems of a 4th wave of the coronavirus pandemic.

Jung Yeon-Je/ AFP through Getty Images

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Jung Yeon-Je/ AFP via Getty Images

Individuals work out at a fitness center in Seoul on Tuesday as South Korea announced execution of level 4 social distancing procedures in the middle of issues of a 4th wave of the coronavirus pandemic.

Jung Yeon-Je/ AFP by means of Getty Images

Physical fitness centers in the capital Seoul and other close-by areas are no longer enabled to play music faster than 120 beats per minute (the speed of “Call Me Maybe” by Carly Rae Jepsen) throughout group physical fitness classes. Fitness centers in the capital Seoul and other neighboring locations are no longer allowed to play music faster than 120 beats per minute (the speed of “Call Me Maybe” by Carly Rae Jepsen) during group physical fitness classes. Still, its not tough to comprehend why health officials are concerned: the greater Seoul area has actually seen a significant increase in COVID-19 cases, striking a record daily high this previous weekend, according to the Yonhap News Agency.

Still, its not hard to comprehend why health authorities are concerned: the greater Seoul location has seen a marked boost in COVID-19 cases, hitting a record daily high this past weekend, according to the Yonhap News Agency. Stringent social distancing procedures have actually been brought out and will remain in location for the next 2 weeks, with events of more than 2 disallowed after 6 p.m., in a quote to get the situation under control. Thats one factor to avoid the fitness center, a minimum of.

Fitness focuses in the capital Seoul and other close-by areas are no longer made it possible for to play music faster than 120 beats per minute (the speed of “Call Me Maybe” by Carly Rae Jepsen) throughout group physical fitness classes. The problem is that extreme exercising, particularly in a group setting, might increase the likelihood of strolling breathing beads and that all the sweat-and-spit slinging might result in more COVID-19 cases. “Hardcore cardio has actually marked the start and end of my everyday exercise routines, and now they want me to run slower, but they ask us to leave in two hours,” Jang, a workplace worker who often goes to the health club, told The Korea Herald.

Physical fitness centers in the capital Seoul and other neighboring locations are no longer allowed to play music faster than 120 beats per minute (the speed of “Call Me Maybe” by Carly Rae Jepsen) throughout group physical fitness classes. Still, its not difficult to understand why health authorities are worried: the higher Seoul location has actually seen a marked increase in COVID-19 cases, striking a record daily high this previous weekend, according to the Yonhap News Agency.